ORT students from the Formet Soviet Union preparing Pesach
WORLD ORT
Educating for life
ORT students from the Formet Soviet Union preparing Pesach
WORLD ORT
Giving life-changing opportunities
ORT students from the Formet Soviet Union preparing Pesach
WORLD ORT
Prioritising STEM education
ORT students from the Formet Soviet Union preparing Pesach
WORLD ORT
Connecting people around the world
ORT students from the Formet Soviet Union preparing Pesach
WORLD ORT
Enhancing employability
ORT students from the Formet Soviet Union preparing Pesach
WORLD ORT
Celebrating Jewish Life
WORLD ORT
Creating opportunities.

World ORT is the world’s largest Jewish education and vocational training non-governmental organisation.

Started in 1880, World ORT is today operational in 37 countries and helps around 300 000 students around the world. Specialised in technology, our mission is to provide communities wherever they are, with the skills and knowledge necessary to cope with the complexities and uncertainties of their environment.

World ORT students are going places

We teach boys and girls to master science and technology, to love their community and to contribute to society. With 300,000 Jewish – and non-Jewish – students in five continents, we’re building a better world through education.

Watch this video to see how. And be a part of the growing World ORT family.

Posts from World ORT Facebook Page

Show your dedication to education this Chanukah
At World ORT we’re dedicated to education. And just as the words ‘Chanukah’ (dedication) and ‘chinuch’ (education) share a common Hebrew root so are our values firmly rooted in Jewish tradition. Our international education network enables us to provide exciting educational opportunities for students and stimulating professional development for our teachers. These effective programmes made a direct impact on hundreds of people this year – people like Yakov Hayon, a principal at Kfar Hasidim Youth Village in Israel. Hear him describe how he benefited in this video. Please support us so hundreds more will benefit next year. We may work wonders but we can’t rely on miracles – even at Chanukah time. Express your dedication to education here: www.ort.org/support-world-ort-education
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December 13th, 10:05 pm

Show your dedication to education this Chanukah

Congratulations to the children at the Scuola della Comunita Ebraica in Milan who have raised €1,100 in a charity bazaar they organised as part of the ORT international network’s celebration of Chanukah!

ORT schools from Latin America, Europe, and the Former Soviet Union shared their experiences as well as local Chanukah traditions and communal activities in a global video link-up hosted by World ORT today.

Ramesh Khordian, a social worker at Milan’s Jewish Community Centre, accompanied the children during the video link-up. She said of their fundraising drive: “This is the miracle of Chanukah for us. With this money we’ll help those children who need it.”

Children from Kishinev, Kiev, Madrid, Mexico City, Rome, Samara, Marseilles, and Milan shared their love of sufganiyot, traditional songs and lighting the menorah during the video-conference. Children also took part in a dreidel design competition for which they used their skills working with 3D printing, textiles, carpentry and animation – the winners will be announced tomorrow.
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December 13th, 5:07 pm

Congratulations to the children at the Scuola della Comunita Ebraica in Milan who have raised €1,100 in a charity bazaar they organised as part of the ORT international network’s celebration of Chanukah!

ORT schools from Latin America, Europe, and the Former Soviet Union shared their experiences as well as local Chanukah traditions and communal activities in a global video link-up hosted by World ORT today.

Ramesh Khordian, a social worker at Milan’s Jewish Community Centre, accompanied the children during the video link-up. She said of their fundraising drive: “This is the miracle of Chanukah for us. With this money we’ll help those children who need it.”

Children from Kishinev, Kiev, Madrid, Mexico City, Rome, Samara, Marseilles, and Milan shared their love of sufganiyot, traditional songs and lighting the menorah during the video-conference. Children also took part in a dreidel design competition for which they used their skills working with 3D printing, textiles, carpentry and animation – the winners will be announced tomorrow.

It's here at last! The ORT family wishes you and your family a bright and happy Chanukah! ... See MoreSee Less

December 12th, 5:39 pm

Its here at last! The ORT family wishes you and your family a bright and happy Chanukah!

Comment on Facebook

Que hermoso😍 Ojalá tuviera una escuela para mis hijas.

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Happy Hannukah from South Africa
They used to call it the Dark Continent - not any more, if ORT South Africa's got anything to do with it! ORT's a beacon of educational progress in the Rainbow Nation and, together with all of us at World ORT, they want to wish you a light-filled, joyous Chanukah!
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December 12th, 3:06 pm

Happy Hannukah from South Africa

The giant dreidel made by primary students at ORT Mishpahteinu School in Kazan reflects the school community’s big heart. “Ours is the friendliest school you can imagine, which is why we call it ‘Mishpahteinu’, meaning ‘our family’. Everything should be great in a big family and so we made a great big dreidel,” said their teacher.

On Chanukah, it is customary to play with a “dreidel” (a four-sided spinning top bearing the Hebrew letters, nun, gimmel, hei and shin, an acronym for nes gadol hayah sham, “a great miracle happened there”). The game is usually played for a pot of coins, nuts, or other treats, which is won or lost based on which letter the dreidel lands when it is spun. Learn about Chanukah here: goo.gl/AST1cv
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December 8th, 12:55 pm

The giant dreidel made by primary students at ORT Mishpahteinu School in Kazan reflects the school community’s big heart. “Ours is the friendliest school you can imagine, which is why we call it ‘Mishpahteinu’, meaning ‘our family’. Everything should be great in a big family and so we made a great big dreidel,” said their teacher. 

On Chanukah, it is customary to play with a “dreidel” (a four-sided spinning top bearing the Hebrew letters, nun, gimmel, hei and shin, an acronym for nes gadol hayah sham, “a great miracle happened there”). The game is usually played for a pot of coins, nuts, or other treats, which is won or lost based on which letter the dreidel lands when it is spun. Learn about Chanukah here: https://goo.gl/AST1cv
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